Alexander Hamilton Quotes. Below is a collection of famous Alexander Hamilton quotes. Here you can find the most popular and greatest quotes by Alexander Hamilton. Share these quotations with your friends and family.

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"Those who stand for nothing fall for anything."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"...for it is a truth, which the experience of all ages has attested, that the people are commonly most in danger when the means of insuring their rights are in the possession of those of whom they entertain the least suspicion."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one! by Alexander Hamilton"

by A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master and deserves one! by Alexander Hamilton

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"Every man ought to be supposed a knave, and to have no other end, in all his actions, but private interest. By this interest we must govern him, and by means of it, make him cooperate to public good, notwithstanding his unsatiable avarice and ambition."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men the great difficulty lies in this: You must first enable the government to control the governed, and in the next place, oblige it to control itself"

by Alexander Hamilton

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"In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men the great difficulty lies in this You must first enable the government to control the governed, and in the next place, oblige it to control itself."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"It has been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is more false than this. The ancient democracies in which the people themselves deliberated never possessed one good feature of government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure deformity."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"It has been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is more false than this. The ancient democracies in which the people themselves deliberated never possessed one good feature of government. Their very character was tyranny their figure deformity."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"It is long since I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"It was no Insurrection or Rebellion, or even Civil War in any proper sense of these terms... The war... was a war between States regularly organized into two separate Federal Republics... In the beginning, and throughout the contest, the object of the 'Confederates' was to maintain the separate Sovereignty of each State, and the right of self-government, which that necessarily carries with it. The object of the 'Federals,' on the contrary, was to maintain a Centralized Sovereignty over all the States on both sides. This was the fundamental principle involved in the Conflict, which must be kept continually in mind."

by Alexander Hamilton Stephens

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"Justice is the end of government. It is the end of civil society. It ever has been and ever will be pursued until it be obtained, or until liberty be lost in the pursuit. In a society under the forms of which the stronger faction can readily unite and oppress the weaker, anarchy may as truly be said to reign as in a state of nature, where the weaker individual is not secured against the violence of the stronger; and as, in the latter state, even the individuals are prompted, by the uncertainty of their condition, to submit to a government which may protect the weak as well as themselves; so, in the former state, will the more powerful factions or parties be gradually induced, by a like motive to wish for a government which will protect all parties, the weaker as well as the more powerful."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Justice is the end of government. It is the end of civil society. It ever has been and ever will be pursued until it be obtained, or until liberty be lost in the pursuit. In a society under the forms of which the stronger faction can readily unite and oppress the weaker, anarchy may as truly be said to reign as in a state of nature, where the weaker individual is not secured against the violence of the stronger and as, in the latter state, even the individuals are prompted, by the uncertainty of their condition, to submit to a government which may protect the weak as well as themselves so, in the former state, will the more powerful factions or parties be gradually induced, by a like motive to wish for a government which will protect all parties, the weaker as well as the more powerful."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Laws are a dead letter without courts to expound and define their true meaning and operation."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Men give me credit for some genius. All the genius I have lies in this when I have a subject in hand, I study it profoundly. Day and night it is before me. My mind becomes pervaded with it. Then the effort that I have made is what people are pleased to call the fruit of genius. It is the fruit of labor and thought."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike"

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Nobody expects to trust his body overmuch after the age of fifty"

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Power over a man's subsistence is power over his will"

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Power may be justly compared to a great river while kept within its bounds it is both beautiful and useful, but when it overflows its banks, it is then too impetuous to be stemmed it bears down all before it, and brings destruction and desolation wherever it goes."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Real firmness is good for anything; strut is good for nothing."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"The changes in the human condition are uncertain and frequent. Many, on whom fortune has bestowed her favours, may trace their family to a more unprosperous station; and many who are now in obscurity, may look back upon the affluence and exalted rank of their ancestors."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"The real object of those who resorted to Secession, as well as those who sustained it, was not to overthrow the Government of the United States but to perpetuate the principles upon which it was founded. The object in quitting the Union was not to destroy, but to save the principles of the Constitution."

by Alexander Hamilton Stephens

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"The same state of the passions which fits the multitude, who have not sufficient stock of reason and knowledge to guide them, for opposition to tyranny and oppression, very naturally leads them to a contempt and disregard of all authority."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself and can never be erased."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Those who stand for nothing fall for anything"

by Alexander Hamilton

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"When men exercise their reason coolly and freely on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions on some of them. When they are governed by a common passion, their opinions, if they are to be called, will be the same."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice, without constraint."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice, without constraint"

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Why has government been instituted at all Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice, without constraint."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"We must make the best of those ills which cannot be avoided."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Constitutions should consist only of general provisions; the reason is that they must necessarily be permanent, and that they cannot calculate for the possible change of things."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Little more can reasonably be aimed at, with respect to the people at large, than to have them properly armed and equipped."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Safety from external danger is the most powerful director of national conduct. Even the ardent love of liberty will after a time, give way to its dictates. The violent destruction of life and property incident to war, the continual effort and alarm attendant on a state of continual danger, will compel nations the most attached to liberty to resort for repose and security to institutions which have a tendency to destroy their civil and political rights. To be more safe, they at length become willing to run the risk of being less free."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Power over a man's subsistence amounts to power over his will."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"It is inherent in the nature of sovereignty not to be amenable to the suit of any individual without its consent. This is the general sense and the general practice of mankind; and the exemption, as one of the attributes of sovereignty, is now enjoyed by the government of every State in the Union. . . . The contracts between a nation and individuals are only binding on the conscience of the sovereign, and have no pretensions to a compulsory force. They confer no right of action, independent of the sovereign will. To...authorize suits against States for the debts they owe...could not be done without waging war against the contracting State..., a power which would involve such a consequence, would be altogether forced and unwarranted."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"In politics, as in religion, it is equally absurd to aim at making proselytes by fire and sword. Heresies in either can rarely be cured by per..."

by Alexander Hamilton

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"A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing."

by Alexander Hamilton

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