Death Quotes

Death is the king of this world: 'tis his park Where he breeds life to feed him. Cries of pain Are music for his banquet

By George Eliot
Death never takes the wise man by surprise, He is always ready to go.

By Jean De La Fontaine
Yet nightly pitch my moving tent, A day's march nearer home.

By James Montgomery
Yet, to the empty trapeze of your flesh, O Magdalene, each comes back to die alone....

By Hart Crane
Yet, when the walls of flesh grow weak, In such an hour it may well be,...

By Ernest Christopher Dowson
You are too young to fall asleep for ever; And when you sleep you remind me of the dead.

By Siegfried Sassoon
You come from attending the funeral of mankind to attend to a natural phenomenon. A little thought is sexton to all the world.

By Henry David Thoreau
you come, a brave ghost, to fix in my mind without praise or paradise to make me your inheritor.

By Anne Sexton
You ever gentle gods, take my breath from me; Let not my worser spirit tempt me again To die before you please!

By Shakespeare
You might as well linger On verandas, enjoying life, knowing The end is essentially unpredictable.

By John Ashbery
You must understand. Death must come to all. Sooner to some, later to others.

By Tom Graeff
You mustn't be afraid of death. When this ship sailed, death sailed on her.

By Charles Larkworthy
You prefer a woman under the earth, you heap roses above a grave;...

By Hilda Doolittle
You went on with your dying. Nothing could stop you. Not your son. Not your daughter Who fed you and made you into a child again.

By Mark Strand
You went to meet the shell's embrace of fire On Vimy Ridge; and when you fell that day...

By Robert Frost
you who put gum in my coffee cup and worms in my Jell-O, you who let me pretend...

By Anne Sexton
You who were directionless, and thought it would solve everything if you found one, What do you make of this? Just because a thing is imm...

By John Ashbery
You will have an affordable death.

By Georg Büchner
Young soul put off your flesh, and come With me into the quiet tomb,...

By Thomas Lovell Beddoes
Your apple face, the simple crèche Of your arms, the August smells...

By Anne Sexton
Your body must become familiar with its death—in all its possible forms and degrees—as a self-evident, imminent, and emotionally neutral s...

By Dag Hammarskjöld
Your death, dear Lady, was quite cold For all the brave tears and ultimate spasm....

By Allen Tate
Your love by ours we measure Till we have lost our treasure, But dying is a pleasure, When living is a pain.

By John Dryden
Your old skin puckering, your lungs' breath Grown baby short as you looked up last...

By Anne Sexton
Who blows death's feather? What glory is colour? I blow the stammel feather in the vein....

By Dylan Thomas
'Who knocks?' 'I, who was beautiful, Beyond all dreams to restore,...

By Walter De La Mare
Whoever has lived long enough to find out what life is, knows how deep a debt of gratitude we owe to Adam, the first great benefactor of our r...

By Mark Twain
Why didst thou leave the trodden paths of men Too soon, and with weak hands though mighty heart...

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
Why do we then shun death with anxious strife? If Light can thus deceive, wherefore not Life?

By Joseph Blanco White
With his worm-eaten maw, And his ghastly jaw Gasping aside, Naked of hide, Neither flesh nor fell.

By John Skelton
With meditating that she must die once, I have the patience to endure it now.

By Shakespeare
with our bones We left much more, left what still is The look of things, left what we felt At what we saw.

By Wallace Stevens
work until my heart is short, then go out slowly with a feeble grin,...

By Richard Hugo
Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me...

By Anonymous
Yea, worse than death: death parts both woe and joy: From joy I part, still living in annoy.

By Sir Philip Sidney
Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve:...

By Christina Georgina Rossetti
Yet once more, O ye laurels, and once more, Ye myrtles brown, with ivy never-sere,...

By John Milton
You know what she died of, Mother Pegg? Of darkness.

By Samuel Beckett
when it comes to my death let it be slow, let it be pantomime, this last peep show,...

By Anne Sexton
When it comes to my own turn to lay my weapons down, I shall do so with thankfulness and fatigue, and whatever be my destiny afterward, I shal...

By Robert Louis Stevenson
When it's over I don't want to wonder if I have made of my life something particular, and real....

By Mary Oliver
Where are our castles now, where are our towers?

By Sir Thomas More
Where have you gone? The tide is over you, The turn of midnight water's over you,...

By Kenneth Slessor
Wherever the corpse is, there the vultures will gather.

By Anonymous
Whether to dry In humming pallor or to leap and die.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
While the body's life, deep as a covered well, Instinctive as the wind, busy as May, Burns out a secret passageway to hell.

By Allen Tate
While the hollow oak our palace is, Our heritage the sea.

By Allan Cunningham
White Godiva, I unpeel— Dead hands, dead stringencies.

By Sylvia Plath
Why do you gather, my townsmen? There is no news here....

By Anne Sexton
Why not make an end of it all?... My life is a succession of griefs and bitter feelings.... What is death?... A very small matter, when all is...

By Stendhal
Why wait for Death to mow? why wait for Death to sow us in the ground?

By Hilda Doolittle
Will you greet your doom As final; set him loaves and wine; knowing...

By Philip Larkin
Wise child, didst hastily return And mad'st thy mother's womb thine urn....

By Ben Jonson
With His penis like a chisel He carved the Pietà....

By Anne Sexton
When a man dies he kicks the dust.

By Henry David Thoreau
When death comes too near, comedy and tragedy fall silent.

By Mason Cooley
When death has you by the throat, you don't mince words.

By Friedrich Dürrenmatt
When Gabriel's trumpet ends all life's delay, Will crash the beams of firmamental woe:...

By Allen Tate
When her soul flies to the predestined dancing-place (I have no speech but symbol, the pagan speech I made...

By William Butler Yeats
When I am dead, my dearest, Sing no sad songs for me; Plant thou no roses at my head, Nor shady cypress tree:...

By Christina Georgina Rossetti
When I die I want to decompose in a barrel of porter and have it served in all the pubs in Dublin.

By J.P. Donleavy
When I have fears that I may cease to be, Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain.

By John Keats
When I have reached the shady underground With but sad hope of coming up again,...

By Allen Tate
When one by one our ties are torn, And friend from friend is snatched forlorn;...

By Anna Letitia Barbauld
When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.

By John Donne
When performing an autopsy, even the most inveterate spiritualist would have to question where the soul is.

By Anton Pavlovich Chekhov
When Sir Robert Walpole was dying, he told Ranby his surgeon that he desired his body might be opened. Ranby acting great horror cried, 'Good ...

By Horace Walpole
When sleep enters the body like smoke and man journeys into the abyss...

By Nelly Sachs
When the body sinks into death, the essense of man is revealed. Man is a knot, a web, a mesh into which relationships are tied. Only those rel...

By Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
When the leaves fall, the whole earth is a cemetery pleasant to walk in. I love to wander and muse over them in their graves. Here are no lyin...

By Henry David Thoreau
when the moment comes we'll talk turkey,...

By Anne Sexton
When the morning was waking over the war He put on his clothes and stepped out and he died....

By Dylan Thomas
When the salt sheet broke in a storm of singing The voices of all the drowned swam on the wind.

By Dylan Thomas
When the swan must fix his eye Upon a fading gleam,...

By William Butler Yeats
When the swift iron burning bee Drained the wild honey of their youth.

By Isaac Rosenberg
when this life is from the body fled, To see it selfe in that eternall Glasse,...

By Fulke Greville
what a grudge I am bearing against Death, that is standing in her two eyes, and will not call me with a word.

By Petrarch
What matter though numb nightmare ride on top And blood and mire the sensitive body stain?...

By William Butler Yeats
what most appals Is that tiny first shiver,...

By Philip Larkin
What shall we say who have knowledge Carried to the heart? Shall we take the act...

By Allen Tate
What the hell, you're going to die of something!

By David Mamet
We know not what it is, dear, this sleep so deep and still; The folded hands, the awful calm, the cheek so pale and chill;...

By Mary Mapes Dodge
We looked down at a glassy glittering icy place many days walking across and very deep, between enormous icy black peaks. All we looked at had...

By Doris Lessing
We may die today, we may die tomorrow, so why worry about this death?

By Anonymous
We should part from life as Odysseus parted from Nausicaa—blessing it rather than in love with it.

By Friedrich Nietzsche
We should turn our death into a celebration, even if only out of a malice towards life: towards the woman who wants to leave—us!

By Friedrich Nietzsche
We sing the funeral, as goes the custom, with the hymn of the Dead. But Manuel, he chose a hymn for the living: the song of the coumbite, the ...

By Jacques Roumain
We thought her dying when she slept, And sleeping when she died.

By Thomas Hood
We 've wholly forgotten how to die. But be sure you do die nevertheless. Do your work, and finish it. If you know how to begin, you will know ...

By Henry David Thoreau
Webster was much possessed by death And saw the skull beneath the skin;...

By T.S. Eliot
Well, there's a remedy for all things but death, which will be sure to lay us flat one time or other.

By Miguel De Cervantes
What has this bugbear Death to frighten man, If souls can die, as well as bodies can?

By Lucretius
Vacant heart and hand and eye, Easy live and quiet die.

By Sir Walter Scott
Vanquished in life, his death By beauty made amends: The passing of his breath Won his defeated ends.

By Lionel Pigot Johnson
Very few people are acquainted with death. They undergo it, commonly, not so much out of resolution as custom and insensitivity; and most men ...

By François La Rochefoucauld, Duc De
Vex not his ghost. O, let him pass; he hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.

By Shakespeare
Victorious men of earth, no more Proclaim how wide your empires are;...

By James Shirley
Walk with the dead For fear of death.

By Philip Larkin
Warren returned—too soon, it seemed to her, Slipped to her side, caught up her hand and waited....

By Robert Frost
Water, earth, air, fire, and the other parts of this structure of mine are no more instruments of your life than instruments of your death. Wh...

By Michel de Montaigne
We are taking the Nautilus down for the last time.

By Earl Felton
We ask for no statistics of the killed, For nothing political impinges on...

By Karl Shapiro
We beg one hour of death, that neither she With widow's tears may live to bury me,...

By Ovid
We die of too much life.

By Herman Melville
We die only once, and it's for such a long time!

By Molière
We die with the dying: See, they depart, and we go with them....

By T.S. Eliot
We die, because we live.

By Herman Melville
We died like aunts of pets or foreigners.

By Randall Jarrell
We have given the world our passion, We have naught for death but toys.

By William Butler Yeats
We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation,...

By T.S. Eliot
We say that the hour of death cannot be forecast, but when we say this we imagine that hour as placed in an obscure and distant future. It nev...

By Marcel Proust
To live in hearts we leave behind Is not to die.

By Thomas Campbell
Too proud to die; broken and blind he died The darkest way, and did not turn away,...

By Dylan Thomas
turn round look at the violet finger (not touching it)...

By Allen Tate
Turn up the lights; I don't want to go home in the dark.

By O. Henry
Two forms move among the dead, high sleep Who by his highness quiets them, high peace...

By Wallace Stevens
Two pale drops of fire. Guttering on the vast consuming darkness. My sister and myself. Shortly they will burn no more.

By Richard Matheson
Uncle Ben's brass bullet-mould And powder horn, and Major Bogan's face...

By Allen Tate
Unhindered in the dingy wards Lives flicker out, one here, one there....

By Philip Larkin
We all labour against our own cure, for death is the cure of all diseases.

By Thomas Browne
We all of us waited for him to die. The family sent him a cheque every month, and hoped he'd get on with it quietly, without too much vulgar f...

By John Osborne
We are afraid that we have not lived. We are not afraid of dying.

By Allen Tate
We are afraid They would envy our delight, In our graves by glow-worm night.

By Thomas Lovell Beddoes
We are all dead men on leave.

By Eugene Leviné
We are all of us resigned to death: it's life we aren't resigned to.

By Graham Greene
We are dying, we are dying, we are all of us dying and nothing will stay the death-flood rising within us...

By D.H. Lawrence
Thou hast made me, and shall thy work decay? Repair me now, for now mine end doth haste;...

By John Donne
Though an unpleasant sort of person, and even a queer threatener withal, yet, if one meets him, one must get along with him as one can; for hi...

By Herman Melville
Though like the wanderer, The sun gone down,...

By Sarah Flower Adams
Though lovers be lost love shall not; And death shall have no dominion.

By Dylan Thomas
'Tis a vile thing to die, my gracious lord, When men are unprepared, and look not for it.

By Shakespeare
'Tis no great valor to perish sword in hand, and bravado on lip; cased all in panoply complete. For even the alligator dies in his mail, and t...

By Herman Melville
'Tis the maddest trick a man can ever play in his whole life, to let his breath sneak out of his body without any more ado, and without so muc...

By Miguel De Cervantes
To be honest, I knew that there was no difference between dying at their years old and dying at seventy because, naturally, in both cases, oth...

By Albert Camus
To die is not to play a part in society; it is the act of a single person. Let us live and laugh among our friends; let us die and sulk among ...

By Michel de Montaigne
To die whole, riddled with nothing but desire for it, is like breakfast after love.

By Anne Sexton
To die, to be really dead, that must be glorious.... There are far worse things awaiting man than death.

By Garrett Fort
To die, to sleep— No more, and by a sleep to say we end...

By Shakespeare
To fear death, my friends, is only to think ourselves wise, without being wise: for it is to think that we know what we do not know. For anyth...

By Socrates
To say yes is to die A lot or a little. The dead wear capably their wry Enameled emblems. They smell.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
To that high Capital, where kingly Death Keeps his pale court in beauty and decay, He came.

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death.

By James Shirley
This morning men deliver wounds and death. They will deliver death and wounds tomorrow. And I doubt all. You. Or a violet.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
This mortal air is one wide pestilence, that kills us all at last.

By Herman Melville
This quarry cries on havoc. O proud Death, What feast is toward in thine eternal cell,...

By Shakespeare
this scythe that mows down kings Exempts no meaner mortal things.

By Francis Beaumont
This sleep is sound indeed, this is a sleep That from this golden rigol hath divorced So many English kings.

By Shakespeare
This world nys but a thurghfare ful of wo, And we been pilgrymes, passynge to and fro; Deeth is an ende of every worldly soore.

By Geoffrey Chaucer
Those near death speak with sincere hearts.

By Anonymous
thou art as Hesperus, giving New splendour to the dead.

By Plato
Thou hast conquered, O pale Galilean; the world has grown grey from thy breath; We have drunken of things Lethean; and fed on the fullnes...

By A.C. Swinburne
Though they be mad and dead as nails, Heads of the characters hammer through daisies;...

By Dylan Thomas
Three forms I see on stretchers lying, brought out there untended lying,...

By Walt Whitman
Three years she grew in sun and shower, Then Nature said, 'A lovelier flower...

By William Wordsworth
Through the certain prospect of death, a precious, sweet- smelling drop of levity might be mixed into every life—but now you strange pharmac...

By Friedrich Nietzsche
Through the port comes the moon-shine astray! It tips the guard's cutlass and silvers this nook;...

By Herman Melville
Thus roving on In confus'd march forlorn, th' adventrous Bands,...

By John Milton
Thus Satan talking to his neerest Mate With Head up-lift above the wave, and Eyes...

By John Milton
Till at latest lingering of the night, indeed just as the dawn appear'd,...

By Walt Whitman
Time and fevers burn away Individual beauty from Thoughtful children, and the grave Proves the child ephemeral:

By W.H. Auden
There's one solution that ends all life's problems.

By Anonymous
These are the small townsmen of death, A man and a woman, like two leaves...

By Wallace Stevens
These funeral-cakes of sweet and sculptured stone.

By Kenneth Slessor
they alive, I dead beneath That board—you'd rave and rend them with your teeth.

By J.M. Synge
They are as neat as a wallet, opening and closing on their coins,...

By Anne Sexton
They are not dead! They have but passed Beyond the mists that blind us here...

By John Luckey McCreery
They borrow words for thoughts they cannot feel, That with a seeming heart their tongue may speak;...

By Jones Very
They darted down and rose up like a wave Or buzzed impetuously as before;...

By Allen Tate
They listened at his heart. Little—less—nothing!—and that ended it....

By Robert Frost
Thin emulous fond flowers are dead, too, And the daft sun-assaulter, he That frighted thee so oft, is fled or dead....

By Robert Frost
Things thought too long can be no longer thought For beauty dies of beauty, worth of worth, And ancient lineaments are blotted out.

By William Butler Yeats
Think of the better world we could build if men and women, if even for a little while longer, were freed from their greatest fear: the fear of...

By Robert D. Andrews
This ae nighte, this ae nighte, MEvery nighte and alle, Fire and fleet and candle-lighte, And Christe receive thy saule.

By Anonymous
This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be;...

By Robert Louis Stevenson
This could be the day. I could slip anchor and wander...

By Audre Lorde
This death was his belief though death is a stone. This man loved earth, not heaven, enough to die.

By Wallace Stevens
This event advertises me that there is such a fact as death,—the possibility of a man's dying. It seems as if no man had ever died in Americ...

By Henry David Thoreau
This is my playes last scene, here heavens appoint My pilgrimages last mile; and my race...

By John Donne
This is the end, the redemption from Wilderness, way for the Wonderer, House sought for All, black handkerchief washed clean by...

By Allen Ginsberg
There is in every one of us an unending see-saw between the will to live and the will to die.

By Rebecca West
There is no death! The leaves may fall, And flowers may fade and pass away—...

By John Luckey McCreery
There is no death! The stars go down To rise upon some other shore,...

By John Luckey McCreery
There is no release In a bodkin or disease, Nor can there be a work so great As that which cleans man's dirty slate.

By William Butler Yeats
There was such speed in her little body, And such lightness in her footfall, It is no wonder her brown study Astonishes us all.

By John Crowe Ransom
There will be better days when I am gone And healing pools where I cannot be healed....

By Arna Bontemps
There's a great spirit gone!

By Shakespeare
The weariest and most loathèd worldly life, That age, ache, penury and imprisonment...

By Shakespeare
The wind sprang up at four o'clock The wind sprang up and broke the bells Swinging between life and death

By T.S. Eliot
The witch turned as red as the Jap flag....

By Anne Sexton
The woods decay, the woods decay and fall, The vapours weep their burthen to the ground,...

By Alfred Tennyson
Then shall thy meteor glances glow, And cowering foes shall shrink beneath...

By Joseph Rodman Drake
Then to the third—a face nor child nor old, very calm, as of beautiful yellow-white ivory,...

By Walt Whitman
Then took he the wound, smiling, And died, content.

By Stephen Crane
Then with no fiery throbbing pain, No cold gradations of decay,...

By Samuel Johnson
Then word goes forth in Formic: 'Death's come to Jerry McCormic, Our selfless forager Jerry.

By Robert Frost
There at the church they took him through the door, His sweet wide mouth much as it was before,...

By Allen Tate
There I sat, in the biting wind, wishing she were gone.

By Samuel Beckett
There in the twilight cold and gray, Lifeless, but beautiful, he lay,...

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The shutters were drawn and the undertaker wiped his feet— He was aware that this sort of thing had occurred before.

By T.S. Eliot
The silence is death. It comes each day with its shock...

By Anne Sexton
The sleeping and the dead Are but as pictures; 'tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil.

By Shakespeare
The stage is about to be swept of corpses. You have no more chance than an infusorian Lodged in a hollow molar of an eohippus.

By Allen Tate
The stained unsightly breath Of carious death.

By Philip Larkin
The stars are pears that no one can reach, even for a wedding. Perhaps for a death.

By Anne Sexton
The tombstone told when she died. Her two surnames stopped me still. A virgin married at rest.

By Dylan Thomas
The town is silent. The night boils with eleven stars. Oh starry starry night! This is how I want to die.

By Anne Sexton
The unique random blend Of families and fashions, there At last begin to loosen.

By Philip Larkin
The waters wild went o'er his child, And he was left lamenting.

By Thomas Campbell
The waves have now a redder glow— The hours are breathing faint and low—...

By Edgar Allan Poe
Then farewell, world; thy uttermost I see; Eternal Love, maintain thy life in me.

By Sir Philip Sidney
Then he told the news media the strange details of his death...

By Anne Sexton
Then I will no longer Find myself in life as in a strange garment

By William Stanley Merwin
Then one will say, 'He is not dead, maybe, Who was mortality's unshaken lover...

By Allen Tate
The poisoned rat in the wall Cuts through the wall like a knife,...

By Allen Tate
The rapt One, of the godlike forehead, The heaven-eyed creature sleeps in earth:...

By William Wordsworth
The rare original heartsblood goes, Spends on the earthen hide, in the folds and wizenings, flows...

By Richard Wilbur
The raven is my talisman.... Death is my talisman, Mr. Chapman. The one indestructible force. The one certain thing in an uncertain universe. ...

By David Boehm
The right time to die is never exactly now.

By Mason Cooley
The salt person and blasted place I furnish with the meat of a fable;...

By Dylan Thomas
The sense of death is most in apprehension, And the poor beetle that we tread upon...

By Shakespeare
The sun may set and rise: But we contrariwise Sleep after our short light One everlasting night.

By Sir Walter Raleigh
The Sweeping up the Heart And putting Love away We shall not want to use again Until Eternity.

By Emily Dickinson
The time comes when our hearts sink utterly; When we remember Deirdre and her tale, And that her lips are dust.

By James Kenneth Stephens
The miller quickly drew the dam, An' there he found a drown'd woman....

By Anonymous
The monument of death will outlast the memory of the dead. The Pyramids do not tell the tale which was confided to them; the living fact comme...

By Henry David Thoreau
The night discharged of all care Where wine may bear no sovereignty;...

By Marcus Valerius Martial
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, But the queerest they ever did see...

By Robert W. Service
The old chains on her bosom do not rise, do not glow when she breathes, nor change colour.

By Hilda Doolittle
The others died, the luck of it blurting through them. I could not, I was a silly broken umbrella...

By Anne Sexton
The lady sleeps! Oh, may her sleep, Which is enduring, so be deep! Heaven have her in its sacred keep!

By Edgar Allan Poe
The last act is bloody, however pleasant all the rest of the play is: a little earth is thrown at last upon our head, and that is the end fore...

By Blaise Pascal
The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.

By Anonymous
The last Night that She lived It was a Common Night Except the Dying—this to Us Made Nature different

By Emily Dickinson
The living blind and seeing Dead together lie As if in love . . . There was no more hating then,...

By Dame Edith Sitwell
The mariner who makes the safest port in heaven, perchance, seems to his friends on earth to be shipwrecked, for they deem Boston Harbor the b...

By Henry David Thoreau
The name of a successor is like the tolling of my own death-bell!

By Elizabeth I
The near touch of death may be a release into life; if only it will break the egoistic will, and release that other flow.

By D.H. Lawrence
The difficulty about all this dying, is that you can't tell a fellow anything about it, so where does the fun come in?

By Alice James
The dust shall sing like a bird As the grains blow, as your death grows, through our heart.

By Dylan Thomas
The fear of death is indeed the pretence of wisdom, and not real wisdom, being the appearance of knowing the unknown.

By Plato
The field of doom bears death as its harvest.

By Aeschylus
The final hour when we cease to exist does not itself bring death; it merely of itself completes the death-process. We reach death at that mom...

By Seneca
The first reading of a Will, where a person dies worth anything considerable, generally affords a true test of the relations' love to the dece...

By Samuel Richardson
The flies swarmed on the putrid vulva, then A black tumbling rout would seethe Of maggots, thick like a torrent in a glen....

By Allen Tate
the focused beam folds all energy in: the image glares filling all space: the head falls and hangs and cannot wake itself.

By Archie Randolph Ammons
The forehead and the little ears Have gone where Saturn keeps the years;...

By Edwin Arlington Robinson
The gentle serpent, green in the mulberry bush, Riots with his tongue through the hush— Sentinel of the grave who counts us all!

By Allen Tate
The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things;...

By James Shirley
The good die first And they whose hearts are dry as summer dust Burn to the socket.

By William Wordsworth
The graceless madness of her lips, Who was the powder-puff of life,...

By Allen Tate
The grass and coloured clay More motion have than they, Joined to the great sunk silences.

By Isaac Rosenberg
The grave's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.

By Andrew Marvell
The infant runs toward it with its eyes closed, the adult is stationary, the old man approaches it with his back turned.

By Denis Diderot
The child who enters life comes not with knowledge or intent, So those who enter death must go as little children sent....

By Mary Mapes Dodge
the clock Beats out the little lives of men.

By Alfred Tennyson
'The cock doth craw, the day doth daw, The channerin worm doth chide;...

By Anonymous
the cold eternal shores That look sheer down To the dark tideless floods of Nothingness Where all who know may drown.

By Edwin Arlington Robinson
The conqueror at least; who, ere Time renders His last award, will have the long grass grow...

By George Gordon Noel Byron
The course of my long life hath reached at last In fragile bark o'er a tempestuous sea...

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness...

By Vladimir Nabokov
The cruelty of death lies in the fact that it brings the real sorrow of the end, but not the end. The greatest cruelty of death: an apparent e...

By Franz Kafka
The day of my birth, my death began its walk. It is walking toward me, without hurrying.

By Jean Cocteau
The dead being the majority it is a natural thing that we should have more friends among these than among the living.

By Samuel Butler
The dead bell, The dead bell. Somebody's done for.

By Sylvia Plath
The dearest events are summer-rain, and we the Para coats that shed every drop. Nothing is left us now but death. We look to that with grim sa...

By Ralph Waldo Emerson
The death ... of a beautiful woman, is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world.

By Edgar Allan Poe
The death clock is ticking slowly in our breast, and each drop of blood measures its time, and our life is a lingering fever.

By Georg Büchner
The death of a dear friend, wife, brother, lover, which seemed nothing but privation, somewhat later assumes the aspect of a guide or genius; ...

By Ralph Waldo Emerson
The dying man doesn't struggle much and he isn't much afraid. As his alkalies give out he succumbs to a blest stupidity. His mind fogs. His wi...

By H.L. Mencken
The end will come quickly, my love. There is a pain beyond pain, an agony so intense it shocks the mind into instant oblivion. We'll find immo...

By Crane Wilbur
The eye-balls were seared with a milky mucus; The madness of a dying soul...

By Edgar Lee Masters
The faceless head lay still. I could not run Or walk, but stood. Alone in the public clearing...

By Allen Tate
Teach me to live that I may dread The grave as little as my bed.

By Thomas Ken
The Abbey always reminds me of that old toast, 'Above lofty timbers, the walls around are bare, echoing to our laughter, as though the dead we...

By Garrett Fort
the black wings of the hospital where nothing will grow

By William Carlos Williams
the blaze Is infinite, eternal: this is death, To die and know it. This is the Black Widow, death.

By Robert Lowell
The body dies; the body's beauty lives. So evenings die, in their green going, A wave, interminably flowing.

By Wallace Stevens
The call of death is a call of love. Death can be sweet if we answer it in the affirmative, if we accept it as one of the great eternal forms ...

By Hermann Hesse
The cemetery isn't really a place to make a statement.

By Mary Elizabeth Baker
Stand close around,ye Stygian set, With Dirce in one boat convey'd,...

By Walter Savage Landor
Statesmen, chiefs, orators, queens, patriots, kings, And dandies, all are gone on the wind's wings.

By George Gordon Noel Byron
Still doth the soul, from its lone fastness high, Upon our life a ruling effluence send....

By Matthew Arnold
Still, it would be perfectly fine with me to die like a nice girl...

By Anne Sexton
Strange that I should have no fear of dying? Well, I have lived so long questioning the unknown, that this plunge into its depths is only the ...

By Karl Brown
Strew on her roses, roses, And never a spray of yew! In quiet she reposes; Ah, would that I did too!

By Matthew Arnold
Strew your gladness on earth's bed, So be merry, so be dead.

By Charles Hamilton Sorley
Such, Echecrates, was the end of our comrade, who was, we may fairly say, of all those whom we knew in our time, the bravest and also the wise...

By Plato
Sun up, sun down, the days slip by and the sand lifted by the breeze will swallow my ship; but I will die here, as I am, standing in my little...

By Simone Schwarz-Bart
Sun, I come to see you for the last time.

By Jean Racine
Surely this is the bitterness of death.

By Anonymous
Susanna's music touched the bawdy strings Of those white elders; but, escaping,...

By Wallace Stevens
Sweare by thy selfe, that at my death thy Sonne Shall shine as he shines now, and heretofore;...

By John Donne
Sweet is death forevermore. Nor haughty hope, nor swart chagrin, Nor murdering hate, can enter in. All is now secure and fast.

By Ralph Waldo Emerson
Swing low swing low sweet sweet chariot. Nothing but a plain black boy.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
Tell me, my soul, can this be death?

By Alexander Pope
Thank Heaven! the crisis — The danger, is past,...

By Edgar Allan Poe
That high All-seer which I dallied with Hath turned my feigned prayer on my head, And given in earnest what I begged in jest.

By Shakespeare
that warm metamorphosis of snow as gentle as the sort that woodsmen know...

By Patricia K. Page
Shea—they call him Scholar Jack— Went down the list of the dead....

By Joseph I. C. Clarke
She's gone for ever. I know when one is dead, and when one lives; She's dead as earth.

By Shakespeare
Should I not hear, as I lie down in dust, The horns of glory blowing above my burial?

By Conrad Aiken
Since the death instinct exists in the heart of everything that lives, since we suffer from trying to repress it, since everything that lives ...

By Eugène Ionesco
Sixteen. Her breasts round, round, and dark-nippled who now these two months long is bones and tatters of flesh in earth.

By Denise Levertov
Sleep sweetly in your humble graves, Sleep, martyrs of a fallen cause;...

By Henry Timrod
Sleep will unshell us, but not yet.

By Philip Larkin
So 'a bade me lay more clothes on his feet. I put my hand into the bed and felt them, and they were as cold as any stone; then I felt to his k...

By Shakespeare
So you may say, 'Greek flower; Greek ecstasy reclaims for ever one who died following intricate songs' lost measure.'

By Hilda Doolittle
So you, O nameless Duchess who die young, Meet death somewhat lovingly...

By Allen Tate
So, when our mortal frame shall be disjoin'd, The lifeless lump uncoupled from the mind,...

By Lucretius
Some dead undid their bushy jaws, And bags of blood let out their flies;...

By Dylan Thomas
Some dying men are the most tyrannical; and certainly, since they will shortly trouble us so little for evermore, the poor fellows ought to be...

By Herman Melville
Some say that gleams of a remoter world Visit the soul in sleep,—that death is slumber,...

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
Someone is dead. Even the trees know it, those poor old dancers who come on lewdly, all pea-green scarfs and spine pole.

By Anne Sexton
Someone who is about to die does not mourn the dead.

By Friedrich Dürrenmatt
Sometimes Death, puffing at the doore, Blows all the dust about the floore:...

By George Herbert
Speak, then, my Beauty, to this dire putrescence, To the worm that shall kiss your proud estate,...

By Allen Tate
Realizing that his time was nearly spent, he gave full oral instructions about his burial and the manner in which he wished to be remembered.....

By for the State of New Hampshire
Remember me when I am gone away, Gone far away into the silent land;

By Christina Georgina Rossetti
Remember then our only shape is death When mask and face are nailed apart at last....

By Philip Larkin
'Remember, man, that thou art dust!' But yet, alas, but seldom I Do think indeed that I must die . . .

By Robert Southwell
Resignedly beneath the sky The melancholy waters lie....

By Edgar Allan Poe
Say the woman is forty-four. Say she is five seven-and-a-half....

By Anne Sexton
Scatter my ashes, strew them in the air: Lord since thou know'st where all these atoms are,...

By James Graham Marquess of Montrose
See in what peace a Christian can die.

By Joseph Addison
Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit, And look on death itself!

By Shakespeare
Shall I make it clear, boys, for all to apprehend, Those that will not hear, boys, waiting for the end,...

By William Empson
She cried and prayed, but what good are prayers and orations when comes this last hour that the Book talks about: when the moon goes out and t...

By Jacques Roumain
She kisses her killed boy. And she is sorry. Chaos in windy grays through a red prairie.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
She lived unknown, and few could know When Lucy ceased to be; But she is in her grave, and oh, The difference to me!

By William Wordsworth
She looks like sleep, As she would catch another Antony In her strong toil of grace.

By Shakespeare
She saw her five young children writhe and die; in that hour she began to watch you, she whose eyes are open forever.

By Denise Levertov
She says, 'But in contentment I still feel The need of some imperishable bliss.'...

By Wallace Stevens
She was beautiful when she died—a hundred years ago.

By Garrett Fort
She was more beautiful than thy first love, But now lies under boards.

By William Butler Yeats
She went in there to muse on being rid Of relative beneath the coffin lid. No one was by. She stuck her tongue out; slid.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
So here it is at last, the distinguished thing!

By Henry James
So I may say, 'I died of living, having lived one hour....'

By Hilda Doolittle
So that he seemed not to relinquish life, but to leave one home for another.

By Cornelius Nepos
Prepare your hearts for Death's cold hand! prepare Your souls for flight, your bodies for the earth;...

By William Blake
Prince Hal. Why, thou owest God a death. Falstaff. 'Tis not due yet, I would be loath to pay him before his day.

By Shakespeare
putting his hope in certain death, lowering his head again to the grass.

By Denise Levertov
Rain falls into the open eyes of the dead Again again with its pointless sound...

By William Stanley Merwin
Romeo. Courage, man, the hurt cannot be much. Mercutio. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door, but 'tis enough, 't...

By Shakespeare
Rosenbloom is dead. The tread of the carriers does not halt...

By Wallace Stevens
Sang a bone upon the shore; 'A child found all a child can lack,...

By William Butler Yeats
Say never the strong heart In the consuming breath Cries out unto the dark The skinny death.

By Allen Tate
Others greater than I have already eulogized you, but none of them ever had the pleasure I had to feel the caresses of your warm, soft hands, ...

By Noa Ben-Artzi Philosof
Our graves that hide us from the searching sun Are like drawn curtains when the play is done....

By Sir Walter Raleigh
People do not become convinced of your reasons, of your sincerity or of the seriousness of your pain until you are dead.

By Albert Camus
Perfect little body, without fault or stain on thee, With promise of strength and manhood full and fair!

By Robert Bridges
Perhaps the whole root of our trouble, the human trouble, is that we will sacrifice all the beauty of our lives, will imprison ourselves in to...

By James Baldwin
Poor thing. To die and never see Brooklyn.

By Anne Sexton
Oh sure, everyone goes back to the earth at some point, but life itself is a thread that is never broken, never lost. Do you know why? Because...

By Jacques Roumain
Oh teach me to see death, and not to fear, But rather to take truce;...

By Henry King
One rational voice is dumb: over a grave The household of Impulse mourns one dearly loved....

By W.H. Auden
One rumor straight comes huddling on another Of death, and death, and death!

By Allen Tate
One way to be born, a hundred to die.

By Anonymous
Only death rescues us from dying.

By Mason Cooley
Only one ship is seeking us a black- Sailed unfamiliar, towing at her back A huge and birdless silence. In her wake...

By Philip Larkin
Or shatter too with him my curious frame: And let these wither, so that he may die,...

By Andrew Marvell
Our Last Will and Testament, providing for the only future of which we can be reasonably certain, namely our own death, shows that the Will's ...

By Hannah Arendt
Over the tree-tops I float thee a song, Over the rising and sinking waves, over the myriad fields and the...

By Walt Whitman
O Lord, methought what pain it was to drown! What dreadful noise of waters in my ears!...

By Shakespeare
O pale, pale now, those rosy lips, I aft hae kissed sae fondly;...

By Robert Burns
O proud death, What feast is toward in thine eternal cell, That thou so many princes at a shot So bloodily hast struck?

By Shakespeare
O thou undaunted daughter of desires! By all thy dower of lights and fires;...

By Richard Crashaw
O world! O life! O time! On whose last steps I climb,

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
O Ye that put your trust and confidence In worldly joy and frail prosperity,...

By Sir Thomas More
O, why should Love, like men in drinking-songs, Spice his fair banquet with the dust of death?

By Alfred Tennyson
Oft have I mused, but now at length I find, Why those that die, men say they do depart.

By Sir Philip Sidney
Oh! snatch'd away in beauty's bloom, On thee shall press no ponderous tomb;...

By George Gordon Noel Byron
Oh, may she deign to stand at my bedside When I come to die; and may she call to me And draw me to her in the blessed place!

By Petrarch
Old Adam, the carrion crow,

By Thomas Lovell Beddoes
Old Day the gardener seemed Death himself, or Time, scythe in hand by the sundial and freshly-dug grave in my book of parables.

By Denise Levertov
old Death, dusty gardener, are you alive yet, do I live on yet, in your gray considering eye?

By Denise Levertov
On mourra seul. We shall die alone.

By Blaise Pascal
On the day that will always belong to you, lunar clockwork had faltered...

By Rita Dove
On the whole, it was not so impressive a scene as I might have expected. If I had found one body cast upon the beach in some lonely place, it ...

By Henry David Thoreau
Once also it was my business to go in search of the relics of a human body, mangled by sharks, which had just been cast up, a week after a wre...

By Henry David Thoreau
Once one's up against it, the precise manner of one's death has obviously small importance.

By Albert Camus
One approaches the journey's end. But the end is a goal, not a catastrophe.

By George Sand
one day anyone died i guess (and noone stooped to kiss his face)...

By E.E. Cummings
Nor bird nor beast Could make me wish for anything this day,...

By William Butler Yeats
Nor blame I Death, because he bare The use of virtue out of earth;...

By Alfred Tennyson
Nor skin nor hide nor fleece shall cover you,...

By Hilda Doolittle
Nor will this overwhelming tendency to do wrong for wrong's sake, admit of analysis, or resolution into ulterior elements. It is a radical, a ...

By Edgar Allan Poe
Nor youth, nor strength, nor wisdom spring again, Nor habitations long their names retain, But in oblivion to the final day remain.

By Anne Bradstreet
Not a flower, not a flower sweet On my black coffin let there be strewn....

By Shakespeare
Not glad, lifeless tycoon, nor sorry feel For neither Bull nor Bear attends your way....

By Allen Tate
Now his wars on God begin; At stroke of midnight God shall win.

By William Butler Yeats
Now if thou wouldst, when all have given him over, From death to life thou mightst him yet recover.

By Michael Drayton
Now launch the small ship, now as the body dies and life departs, launch out, the fragile soul...

By D.H. Lawrence
Now that you are laid out, useless as a blind dog, now that you no longer lurk, the song rings in my head.

By Anne Sexton
Now the poor comb stood up straight But Chucky did not.

By John Crowe Ransom
Now the twitching stops. Now you are still. We are through with physiology and theology, physics begins.

By Alfred Döblin
Now you are a priest, and she is dead, you said, 'she was gay; she suffered too much, but she laughed.'

By Hilda Doolittle
Now, the wry Rosenbloom is dead And his finical carriers tread,...

By Wallace Stevens
O dark dark dark. They all go into the dark, The vacant interstellar spaces, the vacant into the vacant,...

By T.S. Eliot
O Death! thou comest when I had thee least in mind!

By Anonymous
O death, come close mine eyes; More geese than swans now live, more fools than wise.

By Orlando Gibbons
O Death, rock me asleep, Bring me to quiet rest, Let pass my weary guiltless ghost Out of my careful breast.

By George Boleyn
O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?

By Anonymous
O eloquent, just, and mighty Death! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world ...

By Sir Walter Raleigh
O fool, what else is sleep but chill death's likeness?

By Ovid
'O glorious Life, Who dwellest in earth and sun, I have lived, I praise and adore Thee.'...

By Sir Henry Newbolt
O harmless Death! whom still the valiant brave, The wise expect, the sorrowful invite,...

By Sir William Davenant
Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means, Time held me green and dying Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

By Dylan Thomas
Oh Death he is a little man, And he goes from do' to do' ...

By Federal Writers' Project Of The Wor
Oh death, death, why do you never come to me thus summoned always day by day?

By Sophocles
Oh Lord! Open the doors of night for me So that I may leave this place and disappear.

By Victor Hugo
My life closed twice before its close—

By Emily Dickinson
Never let it be said, they are dead, the high-dead.

By Hilda Doolittle
No burst of nuclear phenomenon That put an end to what was going on Could make much difference to the dead and gone.

By Robert Frost
No country is so peaceful as the one that leads into death. Life arches above one's head like a bridgespan, and below it flows the water, carr...

By Alfred Döblin
No man may him hide From Death hollow-eyed,

By John Skelton
No matter whose bed you die in the bed will be yours for your voyage onto the surgical andiron of God.

By Anne Sexton
No one's death comes to pass without making some impression, and those close to the deceased inherit part of the liberated soul and become ric...

By Hermann Broch
No other sun has lightened up my heaven, No other star has ever shone for me;...

By Emily Brontë
Not one death but many, not accumulation but change, the feed-back proves, the feed-back is the law

By Charles Olson
Not Solomon, for all his wit, Nor Samson, though he were so strong,...

By Robert Southwell
Nothing can we call our own but death, And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.

By Shakespeare
Nothing endears so much a friend as sorrow for his death. The pleasure of his company has not so powerful an influence.

By David Hume
Nothing is dead: men feign themselves dead, and endure mock funerals and mournful obituaries, and there they stand looking out of the window, ...

By Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nothing is demonstrable, unless the contrary implies a contradiction. Nothing, that is distinctly conceivable, implies a contradiction. Whatev...

By David Hume
Nothing is so important to man as his own state; nothing is so formidable to him as eternity. And thus it is unnatural that there should be me...

By Blaise Pascal
More than a thousand years it is since she Was beautiful: she trod the living grass; She saw the clouds.

By James Kenneth Stephens
Most souls, 'tis true, but peep out once an age, Dull sullen pris'ners in the body's cage:...

By Alexander Pope
Ms. Dog wouldn't give them her buttocks. She would moon at them....

By Anne Sexton
Mud unto mud!—Death eddies near— Not here the appointed End, not here!...

By Rupert Brooke
My dog lay dead five days without a grave

By Richard Wilbur
My flowery and green age was passing away, and I feeling a chill in the fires had been wasting my heart, for I was drawing near the...

By Petrarch
My Sweeney, Mr. Eliot, is that Australian who came...

By Anne Sexton
Naked I came, naked I leave the scene,

By James Vincent Cunningham
Massa's in de cold, cold ground.

By Stephen Collins Foster
Mie love ys dedde, Gon to hys death-bedde,...

By Thomas Chatterton
Mister death who signs papers then eats telegraphs simply: Shoot them then eats

By Denise Levertov
Lift up our eyes to you? no, God, we stare and stare, upon a nearer thing that greets us here, Death, violent and near.

By Hilda Doolittle
Like figures on an ancient clock, Warrior, or saint, or clown...

By C.D. Andrews
Like pilgrims to th' appointed place we tend; The world's an inn, and death the journey's end.

By John Dryden
Like pilgrims to th'appointed place we tend; The world's an inn, and death the journey's end.

By John Dryden
like the cat I have nine times to die. This is Number Three. What a trash To annihilate each decade.

By Sylvia Plath
Listen. We must all stop dying in the little ways, in the craters of hate, in the potholes of indifference....

By Anne Sexton
Little Bill Daggett: I don't deserve this. To die like this. I was building a house. Will Munny: Deserve's got nothing to do with it.

By David Webb Peoples
Lo! Death has reared himself a throne In a strange city lying alone...

By Edgar Allan Poe
Long since had the dead Become untroubled In the light soil.

By Philip Larkin
Maid of Athens, ere we part, Give, oh, give me back my heart!...

By George Gordon Noel Byron
Man is a bird full of mud, I say aloud. And death looks on with a casual eye and scratches his anus.

By Anne Sexton
man will be blotted out, the blithe earth die, the brave sun Die blind and blacken to the heart:...

By Robinson Jeffers
Man's last day must ever be awaited and none to be counted happy until his death, until his last funeral rites are paid.

By Ovid
Men cannot live forever But they must die forever....

By Allen Tate
Lay me down beneaf de willers in de grass, Whah de branch'll go a-singin' as it pass.

By Paul Laurence Dunbar
Leonid Ivanovich Shigaev is dead.... The suspension dots, customary in Russian obituaries, must represent the footprints of words that have de...

By Vladimir Nabokov
Lest darkness fall and time fall In a long night when learned arteries...

By Allen Tate
Life contracts and death is expected, As in a season of autumn. The soldier falls.

By Wallace Stevens
Life folded Death; Death trellised Life; the grim god wived with youthful Life, and begat him curly-headed glories.

By Herman Melville
Life is a series of diminishments. Each cessation of an activity either from choice or some other variety of infirmity is a death, a putting t...

By Coleman Dowell
Lord, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days, what it is; that I may know how frail I am.

By Anonymous
It seems to me most strange that men should fear, Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come.

By Shakespeare
Just as the mother's womb holds us for ten months not in preparation for itself but for the region to which we seem to be discharged when we a...

By Lucius Annaeus Seneca
Just girt me for the onset with Eternity, When breath blew back, And on the other side I heard recede the disappointed tide!

By Emily Dickinson
Just under the surface I shall be, all together at first, then separate and drift, through all the earth and perhaps in the end through a clif...

By Samuel Beckett
Kind death. O my dark and sultry love.

By Imamu Amiri Baraka
Land and sea, weakness and decline are great separators, but death is the great divorcer for ever.

By John Keats
Last night as if death had lit a pale light...

By Denise Levertov
Lately, I've become accustomed to the way The ground opens up and envelopes me Each time I go out to walk the dog.

By Imamu Amiri Baraka
Let the soil squeal I am the biting man And the velvet dead inch out.

By Dylan Thomas
Let us eat and drink neither forgetting death unduly nor remembering it. The Lord hath mercy on whom he will have mercy, etc., and the less we...

By Samuel Butler
Let us go in; the fog is rising.

By Emily Dickinson
Let us imagine a number of men in chains and all condemned to death, where some are killed each day in the sight of the others, and those who ...

By Blaise Pascal
Liberal hopefulness Regards death as a mere border to an improving picture.

By William Empson
It is pleasant to walk over the beds of these fresh, crisp, and rustling leaves. How beautifully they go to their graves! how gently lay thems...

By Henry David Thoreau
It is snowing and death bugs me as stubborn as insomnia....

By Anne Sexton
It is the blankness that follows gaiety, and Everyman must depart Out there into stranded night, for his destiny...

By John Ashbery
It is time that I wrote my will; I choose upstanding men...

By William Butler Yeats
It is with deep grief that I learn of the death of your kind and brave Father; and, especially, that it is affecting your young heart beyond w...

By Abraham Lincoln
It mattering not how beautiful you were, Or how beloved above all else that dies.

By Edna St. Vincent Millay
It was a transmogrifying bee Came droning down on Chucky's old bald head And sat and put the poison. It scarcely bled,

By John Crowe Ransom
It was not death he feared—it was the disgrace of death, and the misery of the ignominious preparations. He knew in his heart that heaven co...

By Anthony Trollope
It was not dying: everybody died.

By Randall Jarrell
It is a dead heart. It is inside of me. It is a stranger yet once it was agreeable, opening and closing like a clam.

By Anne Sexton
It is because everything is relative That we shall never see in that sphere of pure wisdom and...

By John Ashbery
It is difficult to accept death in this society because it is unfamiliar. In spite of the fact that it happens all the time, we never see it.

By Elisabeth Kübler-Ross
It is hard to have patience with people who say 'There is no death' or 'Death doesn't matter.' There is death. And whatever is matters. And wh...

By C.S. Lewis
It is impossible that anything so natural, so necessary, and so universal as death should ever have been designed by Providence as an evil to ...

By Jonathan Swift
It is not death therefore that is burdensome, but the fear of death.

By Ambrose
It is not death, but dying, which is terrible.

By Henry Fielding
In every grave make room, make room! The world's at an end, and we come, we come.

By Sir William Davenant
In honored poverty thy voice did weave Songs consecrate to truth and liberty;—...

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
In my end is my beginning.

By Mary, Queen Of Scots
In the attempt to defeat death man has been inevitably obliged to defeat life, for the two are inextricably related. Life moves on to death, a...

By Henry Miller
In the death of my son, now more than two years ago, I seem to have lost a beautiful estate,—no more. I cannot get it nearer to me.

By Ralph Waldo Emerson
In the gold mouth of a flower the black smell of spring earth....

By Denise Levertov
In the hope that it may be no intrusion upon the sacredness of your sorrow, I have ventured to address you this tribute to the memory of my yo...

By Abraham Lincoln
In the last scene, between death and ourselves, there is no more pretending: we must speak plain French.

By Michel de Montaigne
In the mind there is a thin alley called death and I move through it as through water.

By Anne Sexton
In the twentieth century, death terrifies men less than the absence of real life. All these dead, mechanized, specialized actions, stealing a ...

By Raoul Vaneigem
In the untimely loss of your noble son, our affliction here, is scarcely less than your own.

By Abraham Lincoln
In this lucid and flexible pattern only one thing remained always stationary, but this fallacy went unnoticed by Martha. The blind spot was th...

By Vladimir Nabokov
In yonder Grave a Druid lies Where slowly winds the Stealing Wave!...

By William Collins
Insane? He is not insane. He simply wants to die.

By Curtis Siodmak
Irrational streams of blood are staining earth; Empedocles has thrown all things about;...

By William Butler Yeats
If thou and nature can so gently part, The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, Which hurts, and is desired.

By Shakespeare
If thou survive my well-contented day When that churl death my bones with dust shall cover,...

By Shakespeare
If thought is life And strength & breath,...

By William Blake
If we confine ourselves to a general and distant reflection on the ills of human life, that can have no effect to prepare us for them. If by c...

By David Hume
If we must absolutely mention this state of affairs, I suggest that we call ourselves 'absent', that is more proper.

By Jean-Paul Sartre
If we must die, O let us nobly die, So that our precious blood may not be shed...

By Claude McKay
If you are not already dead, forgive. Rancor is heavy, it is worldly; leave it on earth: die light.

By Jean-Paul Sartre
If you don't get killed, it's a lucky day for anybody.

By Abraham Polonsky
If, after I depart this vale, you ever remember me and have thought to please my ghost, forgive some sinner and wink your eye at some homely g...

By H.L. Mencken
Ignore death up to the last moment; then, when it can't be ignored any longer, have yourself squirted full of morphia and shuffle off in a com...

By Aldous Huxley
I'll know how to die with courage; that is easier than living.

By Georg Büchner
I—love's skein upon the ground, My body in the tomb— Shall leap into the light lost In my mother's womb.

By William Butler Yeats
I'm not afraid of death but I am afraid of dying. Pain can be alleviated by morphine but the pain of social ostracism cannot be taken away.

By Derek Jarman
In any man who dies there dies with him, his first snow and kiss and fight ... Not people die but worlds die in them.

By Yevgeny Yevtushenko
In bombers named for girls, we burned The cities we had learned about in school—...

By Randall Jarrell
In childhood, death stirred me not; in middle age, it pursued me like a prowling bandit on the road; now, grown an old man, it boldly leads th...

By Herman Melville
I would like to think that no one would die anymore if we all believed in daisies...

By Anne Sexton
I would not that death should take me asleep. I would not have him meerly seise me, and onely declare me to be dead, but win me, and overcome ...

By John Donne
I'd like to live another hundred years yet—and I don't know but I will, too. My teeth are good, and if I can get enough to eat, I don't know...

By Sylvia Dubois
if I am really Dead

By Mari E. Evans
If I had my life over again I should form the habit of nightly composing myself to thoughts of death. I would practise, as it were, the rememb...

By Muriel Spark
If I were a maker of books I should compile a register, with comments, of different deaths. He who should teach people to die, would teach the...

By Michel de Montaigne
If Nature denies eternity to beings, it follows that their destruction is one of her laws. Now, once we observe that destruction is so useful ...

By Marquis de Sade
If only I could nudge you from this sleep, My maimed darling, my skittery pigeon....

By Theodore Roethke
If the propositions of this Discourse are tenable, the 'state of progressive collapse' is precisely that state in which alone we are warranted...

By Edgar Allan Poe
'I shall be one with nature, herb, and stone', Shelley would tell me. Shelley wound be stunned:...

By Wilfred Owen
I shall die as my fathers died, and sleep as they sleep; even so. For the glass of the years is brittle wherein we gaze for a span;...

By A.C. Swinburne
I shall lie folded like a saint, Lapped in a scented linen sheet,...

By Elinor Wylie
I started in to cry and call his name, ...

By Richard Wilbur
I suck in smoke! I smile at grimy mirth, And laugh to think that you had parried death.

By Allen Tate
I swam but the tide came in like ten thousand orgasms. I swam but the waves were higher than horses' necks.

By Anne Sexton
I tell you solemnly That I was sorry to have disappointed him. To be eaten by that beak and become part of him, to share those wings and ...

By Robinson Jeffers
I think we should look forward to death more than we do. Of course everybody hates to go to bed or miss anything, but dying is really the only...

By Florynce R. Kennedy
I used to think of death ... like I suppose soldiers think of it: it was a possible thing that I could well avoid by my skill.

By Stendhal
I wage not any feud with Death For changes wrought on form and face;...

By Alfred Tennyson
I want Death to find me planting my cabbages, neither worrying about it nor the unfinished gardening.

By Michel de Montaigne
I warmed both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

By Walter Savage Landor
I was not at all shocked with this execution at the time. John died seemingly without much pain. He was effectually hanged, the rope having fi...

By James Boswell
I was now at a university in New York, a professor of existential psychology with the not inconsiderable thesis that magic, dread, and the per...

By Norman Mailer
I will not speak of the famous beauty of dead women: I will say the shape of a leaf lay once on your hair....

By Archibald MacLeish
I will play the swan, And die in music.

By Shakespeare
I wish thee peace in all thy ways, Nor lazy nor contentious days; And when thy soul and body part, As innocent as now thou art.

By Richard Corbet
I have made my bed In charnels and on coffins, where black death Keeps record of the trophies won

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
I have put a padlock on you, Mother, dear dead human,...

By Anne Sexton
I have thought there was some advantage even in death, by which we 'mingle with the herd of common men.'

By Henry David Thoreau
I have wrestled with death. It is the most unexciting contest you can imagine. It takes place in an impalpable greyness, with nothing underfoo...

By Joseph Conrad
I hear the death of me, the murderous weeds, the stallion breathing sulphur, the hara-kiri rape,...

By Anne Sexton
I just look at death as not a threat. It's inevitable, and I have an assurance of eternal life.

By Jimmy Carter
I know death hath ten thousand several doors For men to take their exits.

By John Webster
I know that you will bring me to death, and to the house appointed for all living.

By Anonymous
I range the fields with pensive tread, And pace the hollow rooms, And feel (companion of the dead) I'm living in the tombs.

By Abraham Lincoln
I realized people would soon forget me once I was dead. I couldn't even say that this was hard to stomach; really, there's no idea to which on...

By Albert Camus
I sang of death but had I known The many deaths one must have died Before he came to meet his own!

By Robert Frost
I say that Roger Casement Did what he had to do, He died upon the gallows But that is nothing new.

By William Butler Yeats
I see them,—crowd on crowd they walk the earth, Dry leafless trees no autumn wind laid bare;...

By Jones Very
I thought I heard the dark pounding its head On a rock, crying: Who are the dead?

By Allen Tate
I tied down time with a rope but it came back....

By Anne Sexton
I could not die with you,

By Emily Dickinson
I did not know that thou wert dead before; I did not feel the grief I did sustain;...

By Henry Constable
I died for Beauty—but was scarce Adjusted in the Tomb When One who died for Truth, was lain In an adjoining Room—

By Emily Dickinson
I do not find The Hanged Man. Fear death by water. I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring. Thank you.

By T.S. Eliot
'I have cap and bells,' he pondered, 'I will send them to her and die';...

By William Butler Yeats
I have gone forward with Some, a few lonely some. They have fallen to death. I die with them.

By James Wright
I have had playmates, I have had companions, In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days,...

By Charles Lamb
I have heard a good many pretend that they are going to die; or that they have died, for aught that I know. Nonsense! I'll defy them to do it....

By Henry David Thoreau
I like well the ring of your last maxim, 'It is only the fear of death makes us reason of impossibilities.' And but for fear, death itself is ...

By Henry David Thoreau
I am about to die, and that is the hour in which men are gifted with prophetic power.

By Plato
I am about to take my last voyage, a great leap in the dark.

By Thomas Hobbes
I am Anne Rutledge who sleep beneath these weeds, Beloved in life of Abraham Lincoln,...

By Edgar Lee Masters
I am being given, if I may venture the expression, birth into death, such is my impression. The feet are clear already, of the great cunt of e...

By Samuel Beckett
I am dying, Egypt, dying.

By Shakespeare
I am no Poet here; my pen 's the spout, Where the rain water of my eyes run out,...

By John Cleveland
I ask a wreathwhich will not crush my head. And there is no hurry about it;...

By Ezra Pound
I ask myself: what are my views on death, the next world, God? I look into my mind and discover I am too much of a mannikin to have any. As fo...

By W.N.P. Barbellion
I asked her if she wanted to go to the movies that night. She laughed again and told me that she felt like seeing a Fernandel movie. When we g...

By Albert Camus
I asked if I got sick and died, would you With my black funeral go walking too,...

By J.M. Synge
I asked, 'What happens, father, when you die?' ...

By Robert Pack
I bet the worst part about dying is the part where your whole life passes before you.

By Jane Wagner
I can die when I wish to: that is my elixir of life.

By Ernest Renan
I cannot choose but weep to think they would lay him i'th' cold ground.

By Shakespeare
I cannot think this creature died By storm or fish or sea-fowl harmed...

By Andrew Young
I cease my song for thee, From my gaze on thee in the west, fronting the west, communing with thee,...

By Walt Whitman
I don't know much about death and the sorriest lesson I've learned is that words, my most trusted guardians against chaos, offer small comfort...

By Alison Hawthorne Deming
I don't mind about the dead ones. They're dead. The worst of it is, they cling to the living and won't let go.

By Larry Kramer
I dreamed my genesis in sweat of death, fallen Twice in the feeding sea, grown...

By Dylan Thomas
I dreamed that one had died in a strange place Near no accustomed hand; And they had nailed the boards above her face....

By William Butler Yeats
I feel no pain dear mother now, But oh, I am so dry! O take me to a brewery, And leave me there to die.

By Anonymous
Here lies the body of Sir John Guise. Nobody laughs, and nobody cries;...

By Anonymous
Here lies.... You know, Weaver, I've forgotten who we just buried.

By Michael Wilson
Here the bones of birth have cried, 'Though Gods they were, as men they died'.

By Francis Beaumont
Here was a royal fellowship of death.

By Shakespeare
Here, across death's other river The Tartar horsemen shake their spears.

By T.S. Eliot
He's come to die Or else to laugh, for hay is dried-up grass When you're alone.'

By Kenneth Koch
How shall the dead taste the deep treasure they have?

By Robinson Jeffers
How sleep the brave who sink to rest By all their country's wishes blest!

By William Collins
How strange a thing is death, bringing to his knees, bringing to his antlers/The buck in the snow.

By Edna St. Vincent Millay
However others calculate the cost, To us the final aggregate is one,...

By Karl Shapiro
Hurry, Godfather death, Mister tyranny,...

By Anne Sexton
Hush'd in and curtain'd with a blessed dearth Of all that irk'd her from the hour of birth;...

By Christina Georgina Rossetti
I agree that we should work and prolong the functions of life as far as we can, and hope that Death may find me planting my cabbages, but indi...

By Michel de Montaigne
I am renewed by death, thought of my death, The dry scent of a dying garden in September,...

By Theodore Roethke
I am sleepy, and the oozy weeds about me twist.

By Herman Melville
I Am the arrow,...

By Sylvia Plath
—I am the resurrection and the life. That touches a man's inmost heart. —It does, Mr Bloom said....

By James Joyce
I am thy father's spirit, Doomed for a certain term to walk the night,...

By Shakespeare
He set the jug down slowly at his feet With trembling care, knowing that most things break;

By Edwin Arlington Robinson
He tells me how sweet The babies look in their hospital Icebox,

By Sylvia Plath
He turned over on his side with his one year Red as a wound...

By Jon Silkin
he went down As when a lordly cedar, green with boughs,...

By Edwin Markham
He who was Goodness, Gentleness, And Dignity is free, Translates to public Love Old private charity.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
Her cabined, ample spirit, It fluttered and failed for breath. Tonight it doth inherit The vasty hall of death.

By Matthew Arnold
His biting is immortal; those that do die of it do seldom or never recover.

By Shakespeare
His hair long and plausive. Bastard Masturbating a glitter, He wants to be loved.

By Sylvia Plath
his lips meet mine, and a flood Of sweet fire sweeps across me, so I drown Against him, die and find death good.

By D.H. Lawrence
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed;

By John Keats
His white head hung out like a carpet bag and his crotch turned blue as a blood blister,...

By Anne Sexton
Honour came to me, though I sought it not;...

By Hilda Doolittle
How did it die? I called it EVIL. I said to it, your poems stink like vomit.

By Anne Sexton
How easily I could now let go of life!

By Rutherford Birchard Hayes
How gladly would I meet, Mortality, my sentence, and be earth...

By John Milton
How I envy you death; what could death bring,...

By Hilda Doolittle
Good God! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.

By Alexander Pope
Grandfather, you were the pillar of fire in front of the camp and now we are left in the camp alone, in the dark; and we are so cold and so sa...

By Noa Ben-Artzi Philosof
grant me grace, O god, that I My life may mend, sith I must die.

By Robert Southwell
Great is my envy of death whose curt hard sword Carried her whom I called my life away; Me he disdains, and mocks me from her eyes!

By Petrarch
Great is my envy of you, earth, in your greed Folding her in invisible embrace,...

By Petrarch
Great men regard death as going home.

By Anonymous
Grim death, how foul and loathsome is thine image.

By Shakespeare
Haf owre, haf owre to Aberdour, It's fiftie fadom deip, And thair lies guid Sir Patrick Spence, Wi the Scots lords at his feit.

By Anonymous
Hail them, and fall off. Fall off! The drink is not yours, it is not yours! You do not come...

By Charles Olson
Happens to everybody. Horses, dogs, men. Nobody gets out of life alive.

By Irving Ravetch
Have you built your ship of death, O have you? O build your ship of death, for you will need it.

By D.H. Lawrence
Have you noticed that only death arouses our emotions? How we love thee friends who have just passed away, right? How we admire those master w...

By Albert Camus
he bowed and not flinching from her black breath gave her his arm....

By Denise Levertov
He disappeared in the dead of winter.

By W.H. Auden
He first deceas'd; She for a little tri'd To live without him: lik'd it not, and di'd.

By Sir Henry Wotton
He had been, he said, an unconscionable time dying; but he hoped that they would excuse it.

By King Charles II
He is dead, and my hatred has died with him.

By Jean-Paul Sartre
He lives, he wakes,—'tis Death is dead, not he;

By Percy Bysshe Shelley
For when we must resign our vital breath, Our Loves by Fate benighted,...

By Thomas Stanley
For, surely, surely, where Your voice and graces are, Nothing of death can any feel or know.

By Walter Savage Landor
Forgotten and stinking they stick in the can. And the vase breath's better and all, and all....

By Gwendolyn Brooks
Franklin,—Washington,—they were left off without dying; they were merely missing one day.

By Henry David Thoreau
Give her a little grace, What if a laughing eye Have looked into your face? It is about to die.

By William Butler Yeats
Gloucester. Nor further, sir, a man may rot even here. Edgar. What, in ill thoughts again? Men must endure...

By Shakespeare
Go, grandly borne, with such a train As greatest kings might die to gain....

By Richard Henry Stoddard
God's lioness, How one we grow, Pivot of heels and knees!—

By Sylvia Plath
Going down for the last time, the last breath lying, I grapple with eels like ropes—it's ether, it's queer...

By Anne Sexton
gone before To that unknown and silent shore,

By Charles Lamb
Gone the dear chatterer; Death succeeds Atimetus.

By Hilda Doolittle
Father, you died once, salted down at fifty-nine, packed down like a big snow angel, wasn't that enough?

By Anne Sexton
Fear no more the heat o' the sun Nor the furious winter's rages;...

By Shakespeare
Fergus rules the brazen cars, And rules the shadows of the wood,...

By William Butler Yeats
Fie, 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,...

By Shakespeare
For I am rightful fellow of their band. My best allegiances are to the dead.

By Gwendolyn Brooks
For in the word death There is nothing to grasp; nothing to catch or claim;...

By Philip Larkin
for it is dark, as dark as the leathery dead...

By Anne Sexton
For laughter frames the lips of death— Death frames the Singer and the Song.

By Allen Tate
For men were born to pray and save: Romantic Ireland's dead and gone, It's with O'Leary in the grave.

By William Butler Yeats
For my enemy is dead, a man divine as myself is dead, I look where he lies white-faced and still in the...

By Walt Whitman
For slowly even her sense of him And love itself were growing dim....

By Robert Frost
For the most part, the best man's spirit makes a fearful sprite to haunt his grave.

By Henry David Thoreau
For the sword outwears its sheath, And the soul wears out the breast....

By George Gordon Noel Byron
For those who live neither with religious consolations about death nor with a sense of death (or of anything else) as natural, death is the ob...

By Susan Sontag
For thou perhaps at thy return May'st find thy Darling in an urn.

By Thomas Carew
For 'tis not in mere death that men die most.

By Elizabeth Barrett Browning
For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens...

By Anonymous
From the beach the child holding the hand of her father, Those burial clouds that lower victorious soon to devour all,...

By Walt Whitman
From troublous sights and sounds set free; In such a twilight hour of breath,...

By Ernest Christopher Dowson
Fu' I t'ink de las' long res' Gwine to soothe my sperrit bes' If I's layin' 'mong de t'ings I's allus knowed.

By Paul Laurence Dunbar
Every thing admonishes us how needlessly long life is.

By Ralph Waldo Emerson
Everything is being blown away; A little horse trots with a letter in its mouth, which is read with eagerness...

By John Ashbery
Everything that is necessary is also easy. You just have to accept it. And the most necessary, the most natural matter on this planet is death...

By Friedrich Dürrenmatt
Excepting death, there are no great disasters.

By Anonymous
Eyes I shall not see unless At the door of death's other kingdom...

By T.S. Eliot
Eyes that last I saw in tears Through division...

By T.S. Eliot
Fanny was not there! How she would have enjoyed the scene.... I could not but think of her, and in spite of my efforts to prevent, the unbidde...

By Rutherford Birchard Hayes
Far in the forest, dim and old, For her may some tall vault unfold—

By Edgar Allan Poe
Fight death all your days, and die knowing you know nothing.

By Ardel Wray
Flabby, bald, lobotomized, he drifted in a sheepish calm,...

By Robert Lowell
For (as you will guess) it was death I had in mind; Who covets our breath, who seeks and will always find;...

By Philip Larkin
For a person who is dying only eternity counts.

By Friedrich Dürrenmatt
For all of him dead and gone and vanished from us, and all of him which clings to our speech black god of our time.

By Imamu Amiri Baraka
For even bold natures flee, whenever they see Hades close to life.

By Sophocles
For ever will I sleep, while poor maids cry, Alas, for pity stay, And let us die With thee, men cannot mock us in the clay.

By Francis Beaumont
For God was as large as a sunlamp and laughed his heat at us and therefore we did not cringe at the death hole.

By Anne Sexton
For here the lover and killer are mingled who had one body and one heart....

By Keith Douglas
Doomsday is near, die all, die merrily.

By Shakespeare
Down, down, down into the darkness of the grave Gently they go, the beautiful, the tender, the kind;...

By Edna St. Vincent Millay
Duncan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well.

By Shakespeare
Dying is a troublesome business: there is pain to be suffered, and it wrings one's heart; but death is a splendid thing—a warfare accomplish...

By George Bernard Shaw
Dying is almost the least spiritual of our acts, more strictly carnal even than the act of love. There are Death Agonies that are like the str...

By Aldous Huxley
Dying Is an art, like everything else....

By Sylvia Plath
Dying is something we human beings do continuously, not just at the end of our physical lives on this earth.

By Elisabeth Kübler-Ross
Dying is the most embarrassing thing that can ever happen to you, because someone's got to take care of all your details.

By Andy Warhol
Dying people often become childish.

By Georg Büchner
Each dead child coiled, a white serpent, One at each little Pitcher of milk, now empty.

By Sylvia Plath
Each instant of life is a step toward death.

By Pierre Corneille
Each of us like you has died once, each of us like you stands apart, like you fit to be worshipped.

By Hilda Doolittle
Earth that bore with joyful ease Hemlock for Socrates,...

By Charles Hamilton Sorley
Even in the scorched and frozen world of the dead after the holocaust The wheel as it turns goes on accreting ornaments.

By Robert Pinsky
Cried out the whole night long, Crying amid the glittering sea,...

By William Butler Yeats
Cry woe, destruction, ruin, and decay: The worst is death, and death will have his day.

By Shakespeare
Darling Death shouted in his ear,...

By Denise Levertov
David Kessler: Are you really dead, Jack? Jack Goodman: What do you think?

By John Landis
Dead men may envy living mites in cheese, Or good germs even. Microbes have their joys, And subdivide, and never come to death.

By Wilfred Owen
—Dead! says Alf. He's no more dead than you are. —Maybe so, says Joe. They took the liberty of burying him this morning anyhow.

By James Joyce
Dead, hung up indoors, the kingfisher will not indicate a favoring wind, or avert the thunderbolt.

By Charles Olson
Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, Right Reverends and Wrong Reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with Hea...

By Charles Dickens
Dear as remembered kisses after death, And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned...

By Alfred Tennyson
Dear me! I must be turning into a god.

By Vespasian
Dear, beauteous Death! the jewel of the just, Shining nowhere, but in the dark;

By Henry Vaughan
Death and the sun are two things we cannot look on with a steady eye.

By François La Rochefoucauld, Duc De
Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.

By Shakespeare
Death my lord!—it is the deadest of all things.

By Herman Melville